Deepak Chopra quote1

 

 

 

 

Deep Ecology

The scientific definition of the term “ecology” relates to the study of the interrelationships and interactions between living things and their environments.  In Deep Ecology the central idea is that people are an essential part of the planet and not just separate and detached observers.  Deep Ecology emphasizes the interdependent nature of human and non-human life as well as the importance of the ecosystem and natural processes.

 

Definition of Yoga

The root of the word Yoga is yuj, meaning “to join, to yoke, to concentrate one’s attention”.  Yoga is a method of practice leading to conscious union of the human being with universal existence, internally and externally. This includes practices, philosophy and lifestyle to achieve peace, power, spiritual wisdom along with perfect health, sound mind and a balanced personality.

 Yoga for a World out of Balance1

Practicing Yoga with awareness of Deep Ecology is working with the forces of nature, which are not just material energies but powers of consciousness.  Working with the forces of nature occurs at both internal and external levels.  Internally, we need to balance the forces of our own nature as body, mind, breath and spirit.  Externally, we need to harmonize ourselves with the world of nature and with the Cosmic Spirit behind it.  Each one of us is a manifestation of the entire universe and only when we discover the universe within ourselves can we really understand our purpose in life.

 

 

 

Yoga is a way of harnessing the secret powers of nature within us to manifest our own higher natural potentials for a greater awareness. This requires a very deep connection with the world of nature in body, mind and heart. It cannot be done mechanically or en masse, nor made into a franchise. It requires an individual orientation to the living world, which is not just human society but all that is.  We cannot truly think or live yogically without doing so in an ecological way as well.

Yoga Nature Lake 

 

 

 

 


permaculturecoverMollison

Yoga Solutions for life

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PERMACULTURE & YOGA

The outer environment is in danger from global warming, pollution and myriad chemicals. As our toxic outer world spins out of control we become aware of the environmental dangers of disturbed emotions, disease, negative and aggressive thinking.

The external environment is a reflection of the environment within our bodies. When the external environment and ecology is out of synch, our inner ecology is also affected. The mental and emotional pollution within us needs to be restored and harmonised just as the outer pollution does. Yoga practices can restore the inner ecology and Permaculture practices can restore the outer environment and ecology…bringing back harmony and balance internally and externally. The two are intricately connected.

For inner and outer ecology we have to consider the food we are consuming…the soil and how the food is grown. If the food we eat is impure then our mind and thinking will be impure also. Food has a tremendous influence on our mind. It forms the mind as well as the body. If our environment is sick and depleted, we will become sick and depleted also. Through yoga we realize that it is our duty and responsibility to look after the two gifts we have been given, namely, the environmental complex upon which we depend for our survival, and the body-mind complex in which we live.

Combining Yoga & Permaculture is a foundation for complete approach to living a sustainable and healthy life.

Permaculture design concept is an abundant, integrated and practical method of developing the external ecosystem. Yoga is the inner ecology of living consciously, spiritually, and harmoniously in the world. Both concepts compliment each other and blend together to develop a sustainable lifestyle within one’s inner self and the outer environment.

Come to our corner of paradise in New Zealand and join us at: Anahata Yoga Retreat for our upcoming Yoga & Permaculture Design Certificate Course 12th – 29th November in beautiful Golden Bay, South Island.

For more information:

www.anahata-retreat.org.nz

yoga@anahata-retreat.org.nz

Anahata Yoga Retreat is located in a spectacular natural environment, near the Abel Tasman National Park. Permaculture design certificate courses were among the first offerings at Anahata with the permaculture concepts being integral to its development. Anahata runs on solar power, has four different examples of straw bale and earth buildings, an extensive natural waste water system, organic gardens and orchards. As a work in progress, all who come contribute to the continuing development of this sacred space, whilst learning valuable life skills for the health and wellbeing of individuals, communities and society as a whole.

Yoga anahata

Permaculture garden

Yoga class in the earth yurt Anahata 

and

Permaculture garden

 

 

 

 

 

Chakra  view

 

 

 

 

Anahata main bld

 

 

View from straw bale studio at Anahata

and

Anahata main building 

 

 

 


 


Anahata Sadhana hall

 

Anahata yoga1

 

Strawbale building Anahata

 

 

 

PDC solarhouse

 

 

 

 

 

PDC Swales PDC flowform

 

 

 

 

Permaculture Design Course

This is a truly unique course integrating Inner Ecology (yogic lifestyle) with Outer Ecology (Permaculture).  

Starting: Thursday, 12th November

Finishing: Saturday, 29th November 2015

 

Venue: Anahata Yoga Retreat, Golden Bay, NZ

Permaculture Teachers: Robina McCurdy, Courtney, Tobias, Jennifer Divyajyoti Michelsen and assistants

Yoga: Jennifer Divyajyoti Michelsen, Nityadrashta, Swami Kriyaratna and Anahata Retreat teachers

The tutors and yoga teachers of this course have extensive experience in Permaculture and Yoga.

 ‘Permaculture’ is an integrated land use design methodology based on ecological principles, with practical application from sustainable household to eco-nation to global restoration.

Permaculture design concept is an abundant, integrated and practical method of developing the external ecosystem. Yoga is the inner ecology of living consciously, spiritually, and harmoniously in the world. Both concepts compliment each other and blend together to develop a sustainable lifestyle within one’s inner self and the outer environment.

This course is the standard residential International Permaculture Design Certificate curriculum, taught in an integrated hands-on way, culminating in a comprehensive land-use design project. Yoga, deep relaxation and meditation sessions will be woven into the daily schedule bringing you a unique course combining inner ecology (yoga) with the outer ecology (Permaculture).

The course includes practical skill building activities, mini-design exercises, and visits to inspirational properties that demonstrate Permaculture in practice. It takes place in an intentional eco yoga community and incorporates the exploration of Deep Ecology, theconnection to nature and element themed yoga practices aimed at enhancing personal sustainability that extends out into the wider community.

The course includes practical skill building activities, mini-design exercises, and visits to inspirational properties that demonstrate Permaculture in practice. It takes place in an intentional eco yoga community and incorporates the exploration of Deep Ecology, theconnection to nature and element themed yoga practices aimed at enhancing personal sustainability that extends out into the wider community.

The course includes practical skill building activities, mini-design exercises, and visits to inspirational properties that demonstrate Permaculture in practice. It takes place in an intentional eco yoga community and incorporates the exploration of Deep Ecology, theconnection to nature and element themed yoga practices aimed at enhancing personal sustainability that extends out into the wider community.

Upon completion, a Permaculture Design Certificate will be issued by The Institute of Earthcare Education Aotearoa.

The Permaculture Course Program broadly covers:

  • ·      Permaculture ethics, design principles and implementation
  • ·      Organic growing methods (vegie gardens, herbs, fruit)
  • ·      Rural land management (orchards, pastures, trees, water systems)
  • ·      Integrated animal systems
  • ·      Water harvesting & storage, grey-water & ‘waste’ recycling,
  • ·      Ecological building
  • ·      Renewable energy systems
  • ·      Suburban-scale design.

Anahata Yoga Retreat

Anahata is located in a spectacular natural environment, near the Abel Tasman National Park. Permaculture design certificate courses were among the first offerings at Anahata with the permaculture concepts being integral to its development. Anahata runs on solar power, has four different examples of straw bale and earth buildings, an extensive natural waste water system, organic gardens and orchards. As a work in progress, all who come contribute to the continuing development of this sacred space, whilst learning valuable life skills for the health and wellbeing of individuals, communities and society as a whole.

 The Yoga Program includes: 

  • Hatha yoga
  • Chanting
  • Yoga Nidra- deep relaxation for inner sustainability
  • Guided meditation
  • Kirtan (singing mantras to music)
  • Havan (ancient Vedic fire ceremony to honour the elements)
  • Times of silence

Registrations will be on a “first come” basis upon application and will open 1st May, 2015. Applications are open to NZ and overseas participants.

Registrations will be on a “first come” basis upon application and will open 1st May, 2015. Applications are open to NZ and overseas participants.

Investment:

NZ$ 2050 (shared accommodation)

NZ$ 1850 (camping)

Early Bird discount 10% if paid in full by 15th September.

 Limited private accommodation available. Please enquire for prices.

The cost includes registration, tuition, field trips, course materials, vegetarian food, accommodation, yoga classes & practices.

Scholarships and post course work exchange opportunities are available for this course. Please contact us for details and applications.

Enquiries and Enrolment: Anahata Yoga Retreat

Permaculture poster

 


The Banyan Seed

 

 

There was once a cobbler who lived a simple and honest life. He was a poor man and had to work hard to support his wife and children, but whatever little extra he had he devoted to the worship of Vishnu, the Lord of Creation. He lived beside a huge banyan tree. Like all banyan trees its central trunk was massive, surrounded by smaller trunks that hung down from the branches to put out fresh roots. The tree was very old and was just like a small forest. One day, as he worked in the shade of the banyan tree, the great teacher Narada came to visit him. Narada is famous among all Hindus as the personal messenger and friend of Vishnu. He is able to see Vishnu whenever he wants, but he spends most of his time travelling throughout the universe, visiting Vishnu’s devotees and instructing them. The cobbler was very happy to receive so honoured a guest. After welcoming him with proper respect he ventured to ask if he had recently seen Vishnu.  

“Yes”, replied Narada, “I have just been with him and he has sent me to see you.”

The cobbler was amazed to hear that Vishnu had sent Narada to him. No one important ever came to see him…he was only a shoemaker. What possible interest could Vishnu have in him? After some time his curiosity overcame his shyness.

“Why did Vishnu want you to see me?”

“He thought you might have some questions.”

“Questions?” The cobbler was surprised. Narada himself had come to answer his questions! Of course, he did have questions from time to time, but now, with this unique opportunity, his mind went blank. In confusion he racked his brain for something to ask. Suddenly he thought of something. It wasn’t very profound, but as least it was a question.

 

“What was Vishnu doing when you saw him?”

Now Vishnu knew that the cobbler, although simple-hearted was really a very special person, and he knew what would happen when Narada suddenly appeared in front of him. Because he knows everything, he knew the cobbler would ask this exact question. Wanting to teach Narada a lesson, he had already told him what his answer should be.

“He was threading an elephant through the eye of a needle.”

“Threading an elephant through the eye of a needle?” The cobbler was surprised. He hadn’t expected that Vishnu would be doing this. “Well”, he laughed, “only Vishnu could do that

“Surely you don’t believe me,” smiled Narada, amused at the cobbler’s simplicity. He had given this answer merely to test the cobbler and didn’t expect him to believe it. “I don’t think even Vishnu could really do that…it’s impossible.”

“Why can’t Vishnu do that?” Nothing’s impossible for Vishnu. This world is full of his miracles. He makes the sun rise each day. He makes the wind blow. He makes the rivers run and the trees and flowers grow.

“Look at this”, the cobbler went on as he bent to the ground and picked up a seed from beneath the banyan tree, “inside this seed is a banyan tree as big as the one above us. It’s just waiting to come out. If Vishnu can squeeze a whole tree into such a tiny seed, surely he can thread an elephant through the eye of a needle.”

I am the seed of all existence. There is no being, moving or still, that exists without Me.  (Krishna in the Bhagavad Gita)


Farm2Farm4 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Avice From an Old Farmer

·      Your fences need to be horse-high, pig-tight and bull-strong.                 

·      Keep skunks and bankers at a distance.

·      Life is simpler when you plow around the stump.

·      A bumble bee is considerably faster than a John Deere tractor.

·      Words that soak into your ears are whispered… not yelled.

·      Meanness don’t jes’ happen overnight.

·      Forgive your enemies; it messes up their heads.

·      Do not corner something that you know is meaner than you.

·      It don’t take a very big person to carry a grudge.

·      You cannot unsay a cruel word.

·      Every path has a few puddles.

·      When you wallow with pigs, expect to get dirty.

·      The best sermons are lived, not preached.

·      Most of the stuff people worry about ain’t never gonna happen anyway.

·      Don’t judge folks by their relatives.

·      Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.

·      Live a good, honorable life… Then when you get older and think back, you’ll enjoy it a second time.

·      Don‘t interfere with somethin’ that ain’t bothering you none.

·      Timing has a lot to do with the outcome of a Rain dance.

·      If you find yourself in a hole, the first thing to do is stop diggin’.

·      Sometimes you get, and sometimes you get got.

·      The biggest troublemaker you’ll probably ever have to deal with, watches you from the mirror every mornin’.

·      Always drink upstream from the herd.

·      Good judgment comes from experience, and a lotta that comes from bad judgment.

·      Lettin’ the cat outta the bag is a whole lot easier than puttin’ it back in.

·      If you get to thinkin’ you’re a person of some influence, try orderin’ somebody else’s dog around..

·      Live simply. Love generously. Care deeply. Speak kindly. Leave the rest to God.

·      Don’t pick a fight with an old man. If he is too old to fight, he’ll just kill you.

·      Most times, it just gets down to common sense.

 


Question: What Can I Grow in a Small Sub-Tropical Back Yard?

The answer: Way more than you might think possible! All it takes is a little planning and some research on how big plants will grow.

Here is what I’m growing in my back yard in Northern Rivers, NSW, Australia! Below is a picture of my back yard garden that includes three raised garden beds. One is a herb garden and the other two are for veggies. As you can see the two veggie gardens have been mulched (after fertilizing) and are ready for planting out with summer vegetables. Also: in a cooler climate many of these plants can be grown in pots and taken inside during the winter.

Herb Garden and entire garden

Raised garden beds ready to plant with veggies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I plant my strawberries in pots as they tend to spread prolifically and take over if planted in a garden bed. Of course planting in a garden bed is fine if you want heaps of strawberries. I mulch my strawberries with pine needles to create a more acidic environment that strawberries like. As the runners grow off the mother plant they can be placed in the new pots and they will grow and fill the pot. This can be endless, depending on how many pots you can fit in your yard. 

Strawberries in pots

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I love my herb garden. It contains tulsi, echinacea, aloe, gota kola, basil, dandalion and oregano. In the pots nearby I have parsley, peppermint and mint. I use all my herbs for tea. I select two or three varieties each night to sip on after dinner.  Lavendar, roses and a small teatree bush grow in the garden bed by the peppermint.

Herb garden with Tulsi and Echinacea

Peppermint mint and lavendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I utilise my fences. A abundant grape vine grows along one fence and a passionfruit along another. The grape vine clings onto the rosemary and camellia bushes for support which seems to work well as I’m running out of fence. Each year the grape vine comes back stronger, bigger and with more fruit.  

Grape vine on fence and Rosemary bush

Passionfruit on fence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I keep the loquat tree pruned back and it now produces lots of fruit. It is such a beautiful tree. Next to the loquat tree I have three baby blueberry bushes and a lemon balm in a pot (which makes a wonderful, flavoured tea). Unfortunately the grasshoppers like my lemonbalm as much as I do.

Blueberries  Lemonbalm

Loquat tree2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have a dwarf avocado, dwarf mulberry and lemon verbena in pots next to one of the raised garden beds. The avocado and mulberry are small now but will eventually produce abundant fruit. I make sure I fertilise all pots at least twice a year. One of my favourite teas is lemon verbena. Lemon verbena is easy to grow, and although the bush dies back somewhat during winter, it comes back in full force at the beginning the summer. Reminder: Avocados do not like “wet feet”, therefore they need to be in a good size pot with large holes so that the soil will drain well.   

Dwarf Avocado in pot

Dwarf Mulberry in pot

Lemon Verbena in pot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I have a lemonaid tree next to a curry leave tree. I keep both pruned back so they don’t take up too much room. The lemonaid is prolific and always loaded with fruit. Next to the curry leaf is a pot with tumeric. Tumeric is so easy to grow and the rhizomes (roots) can be harvested and grated into food…great for arthritis and other ailments. As long as a small amount of rhizome is left in the pot, the plant will sprout again the next summer. Turmeric is related to ginger, and like ginger is a beautiful plant that will produce a white flower similar to the ginger plant.

Lemonaid Tree and herb pots

Curry Leaf tree and Turmeric in pot

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Last but not least is my papaya. I have three papaya trees and they brighten up a yard while producing wonderful fruit.

Papaya

 

 



card-and-book2-228x228The digital download version of Nature’s Creation – Knowledge and Guidance Through Healing Plants is now available in 3X different ebook formats. It still has each of the 40 medicinal plants as chapters in the book. However, instead of using the deck of cards (that accompanies the hard copy of the book) to recognise an issue and facilitate its release, simply click on the desired plant and then scroll down to the Insight at the end of the chapter on the particular plant that you select. Choose a plant daily or whenever you need guidance and support. Browse the corresponding chapter to get a feeling for the plant and what it’s offering you and to reflect on the gentle lesson it teaches.

Learn about medicinal plants, their history, myths, and, most importantly, their healing properties. Discover how you can utilise the plants’ medicinal qualities through a variety of herbal preparations. Tinctures, decoctions, flower essences, essential oils and herbal teas can be powerful tools in healing on all levels – physical, mental and emotional.

 

EPUB format (Ipads & tablets) – Knowledge & Guidance Through Healing Plants

Ebook download format – suitable for tablets such as iPad  – $7.50

Kindle format (Mobi) – Knowledge & Guidance Through Healing Plants

Ebook Download format – suitable for Kindle – $7.50

PDF format ( – Knowledge & Guidance Through Healing Plants

Ebook Download format – universal PDF format – $7.50

Physical Book and Cards – Knowledge & Guidance Through Healing Plants

Use thebook and cardsto learn about over 40 medicinal plants, their history, myths, and, most importantly, their healing properties. – $39.00 Australia

 


THAT FOOD COMES FROM WHERE?

Information from FoodTank Article

Some of the most popular and common foods worldwide have interesting and unexpected backstories, growing in places and forms quite unimagined. From the cashew nut, which is actually a single seed of an apple, to proteins raised in petri-dishes. Discover ten foods that grow in peculiar ways. 

 

Cashew NutsCashew Apple tree

The cashew nut—native to Brazil and now grown extensively in Africa, India, and Vietnam—is a readily available kidney-shaped nut popular with eaters all over the world. But, not as well understood, is that a single cashew actually grows out the bottom of a cashew apple, which is about three times the size of the nut. Unlike other nuts, the cashew—which is actually a seed—cannot be bought in a shell, because the cashew’s shell is toxic. Due to this toxicity in the lining of the shell, many Latin Americans and West Indians ate the cashew apple and threw the nut away.

 

CinnamonCinnamon tree

Many of the spices used in everyday cooking come from grounding up of the seed, such as cumin, fennel, and cardamom. However, cinnamon—a popular spice used in baking, curries, and desserts—does not come from a seed, but from stripping back the bark of a cinnamon tree. When grown outdoors in tropical regions such as Sri Lanka, the tree can grow up to 20 to 30 feet and the cinnamon bark is harvested from trees that are over two years of age. The outer bark is scraped off and the rolls of the barks dry to form the cinnamon sticks used in cooking.

CranberryCranberries growing

Continuing the run of unexpectedly grown foods beginning with ‘C’ is the cranberry. Rather than growing on a tree or on a bush, this North-American native fruit is most often grown in bogs. Produced primarily in the United States, Canada, and Chile, the beds of the bogs, which consist of layers of sand, peat, gravel, and clay, are an ideal growing spot for the fruit. The cranberry vines spread over the floor of the bog, and the cranberries float in the water, which make harvesting easier. When you see farmers wading in the field of floating cranberries, it is harvest time!

 

JabuticabaJaboticaba-tree

The lesser known, Jacuticaba (or Myrciaria Cauliflora), is a Brazilian fruit that grows on the side of a tree in an unexpected way. The small black fruit looks like a grape, but unlike a grape, they do not have a stem. Rather, the fruit grows all over the tree, straight from the trunks, making the tree look like it has been infested with bugs, or by a strange, spotty disease that is suffocating the tree. It remains contested whether or not the jabuticabo exists outside of Brazil, with reports that there are trees in other parts of South America, as well as in California. Either way, check out the jacuticaba!

 

MushroomsWild Mushroom2

Mushrooms are known for growing in strange places: Morel Mushrooms, which people scour for in forests, railway tracks, or fencerows across North America; to the Lion’s Mane (or Bearded Tooth) Mushroom, which falls from trees like a man’s beard. In France, the La Cave Des Roches(Mushroom Caves) are a network of 75 miles of caves and tunnels used for growing mushrooms. The humid air and constant temperature of 53 degrees Fahrenheit in the cave is perfect for mushroom cultivation.

Pine Nutspinenut-cone-opening 1

Often used as a festive decoration or ornament, the pine cone actually has another important function—the growing place of the pine nut. There are approximately 50 seeds in each pine cone hidden in the overlapping scales. But don’t wait too late; if the pine cone is open, the nuts have most likely already been eaten by animals!

Petri-Dish Proteinspetri-meat-4ec1794-intro

Perhaps not an appealing thought, but the world’s first lab-produced hamburger—at a cost of$US300,000—has been grown in a petri dish. Maastricht University’s Mark Post, who used muscle cow cells to manufacture the meat, sees test-tube meat as a solution against the environmental and ethical issues involved in meat production. New Harvest, a non-profit committed to the development of meat substitutes, are also growing meat in a lab—without the use of animals—as part of their vision to render factory farming obsolete.

 

Vegetable Reincarnationregrow-veggies-2-400x300grow-bok-choy-from-kitchen-scraps-300x270

There exist a number of vegetables that can be grown from the scraps of food already used, right on a windowsill at home! The list includes scallions, romaine lettuce, lemongrass, celery, onions, and bok choy—all of which can be regrown from the discarded roots, or head, of the vegetable. Try celery at home: just chop the celery stalks from the base, place the base in a bowl of warm water in a sunny place. After a week, new leaves will have grown and thickened, and the new base can be replanted to grow into a celery plant right in your home. You can even try growing a pineapple from the discarded top, but patience is key, as the process can take up to two years to bear fruit!

 

Wild Ricewild-rice

Wild rice is actually not rice, but a semi-aquatic grass, which is traditionally grown in shallow water along edges of rivers, streams, and lakes. Rooted in the sediment and mud, the grass (which grows up to nine foot tall) has ribbon-like leaves. The leaves initially grow underwater, but the third set of leaves grows above the water level. The seeds on these leaves mature, turn brown, and fall off into the water. If not eaten by a passing duck, or harvested, some seeds survive to root themselves in the mud and grow into a new plant in the following season!

 

Witchetty GrubsWitchetty-GrubAboriginal-woman-collecting-witchetty-grubs-Australia

The witchetty grub may not be at the top of a food most-wanted list—and may create a shudder at the thought of eating one—but this Australian bush food, popular among the indigenous population, is certainly grown in an unexpected place. The plump and nutrition-filled insect, which is the larvae of a Giant Wood Moth, is either found buried inside the timber of tree or up to half a meter below the ground inside the roots. Don’t forgo eating one if offered: the taste of the witchetty grub has been likened to scrambled eggs or fried egg with a hint of almond!