I went to bed last night with a scratchy throat…the kind you get when you feel like you may be coming down with something but no real specific symptoms…more a feeling of unbalance and exhaustion. This morning I was aware of the same feeling so I took some immune strengthening herbs.

I stopped by the Organic shop on my way home from the grocery store to pick up a couple of dry herbs. I walked in and I was immediately drawn to the liquid Echinacea supplement. Echinacea is best known for its positive effect on the immune system. Herbalists regard Echinacea as one of the best antibiotics and blood purifiers…activating the immune system, and helping to resist disease.

I returned home and decided to draw one of the Insight cards from my book, Nature’s Creation – Knowledge and Guidance through Healing Plants. Synchronicity. I was a bit taken back when I drew the Echinacea card and immediately connected with the message this plant was sharing with me. I was not coming down with something but my immune system was definitely out of balance. The Insight message below rang clear and true.

Insight…quoted from the book.

“If you have drawn the Echinacea card today it is time to pay more attention to your physical needs, especially your immune system. You may be under stress at home or at work or you may have had some physical or emotional trauma recently. It could be that you are not aware of the stress you have taken on. The effects of stress or trauma may be underlying and not obvious; however, if the stress isn’t recognised it may manifest in an immune-related illness. The fact that you have chosen this card at this time is an indication that you are likely holding on to stress in some way, consciously or unconsciously.

The power of Echinacea will enable you to look within and re-connect with your intuition to bring to the surface any underlying stress. In order to release the stress you must be able to take responsibility for everything that occurs in your life without blame. By acknowledging the stress you are then able to release it fully and once again feel your inner strength and calm return. This will bring balance back to your immune system with a renewed feeling of wholeness, freedom and inner peace”.

I had an “ah ha” moment. I knew exactly what was causing this imbalance and how to change it. As the author of this book, I had to remind myself that I too need a refresher course on the power of medicinal plants and how to once again, “stop and smell the roses” (or the Echinacea).


I’m beginning to gather my annual and perennial medicinal herbs to plant out in my garden and/or in pots. In the photo above (left) I have comfrey, viola, calendula, mint varieties, Herb Robert, yacon, and nasturtiums ready to plant. In the pots, I have strawberries and lavender. Below are pictures of my herb garden, comfrey, and Herb Robert.

I like to plant mint and comfrey in pots as both of these species can take over the garden very quickly if left to their own devices. Comfrey will re-grow from the most minuscule piece of root left under the earth. A trick I’ve used in the past is to plant them in good sized pots, dig a hole in my garden and put the whole pot, with the plant potted inside into the hole. This method prevents the roots from escaping and the plant taking over the garden. They then become part of the herb garden and stay within their boundaries.

My little herb garden has been fertilised, mulched and left over winter. It’s now ready to plant out. This garden gets lots of sun in the summer so I have another little garden space for shade-loving plants like Herb Robert (above). My climate is sub-tropical, therefore the herbs I’m planting grow well in this climate. It is best to do some planning and figure out which plants will be happy planted in your garden bed and which ones would prefer a pot outside or even inside on the kitchen windowsill. I planted my lavender in a pot so I can control how much water it gets. Lavender does not particularly like the humid, sub-tropical climate or wet feet. My strawberries are in pots on the edge of my garden bed as strawberries are another plant that spreads rapidly and takes over. I only have a small herb garden so I have to plan it out well. I like to have a low maintenance, easy to manage garden. Everything comes down to how much space is available in your garden and what you choose to plant. It is important not to overcrowd the garden and to leave space for each plant to stay healthy and to grow to its optimum size…especially if you are using the plant medicinally.

Companion planting is also something I like to do. I know that nasturtiums and calendula like kale so I will plant a few kale plants with them. I’ve learned that kale isn’t keen on strawberries so I will keep the strawberry pots well away from the kale. Mint is good around cabbage and tomatoes but not parsley or chamomile. Lemon balm is often called bee balm as it attracts bees that pollinate other plants in the garden. Check out companion planting as a diverse mix of plants that are compatible makes for a healthy and beautiful herb garden.

Nature’s Creation Book and Cards have lots of good information about many of the available herbs and how to use them medicinally. www.naturescreation.biz